Coloradan Magazine Archives

University of Colorado Boulder

Dr. Gridiron

In the annals of CU football, Derek McCartney has a famous name. Now he’s making one for himself.

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Climate Crusade

Ask professional big mountain skier Chris Davenport (Hist’93) what he’s been doing for work lately, and he’ll rattle off a list of epic adventures that leaves even the most ambitious powder-hounds salivating. In 2011 alone, he skied 150 days on six continents, guided a client up Mount Everest, completed a rare ski descent of its fabled Lhotse Face (elevation 24,000 feet) and led adventure travelers on an eight-day excursion to the untouched powder stashes of the Antarctic Peninsula.

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A passion for fashion

From designing dresses for actresses Susan Sarandon and Michelle Pfeiffer to outfitting Jenna and Barbara Bush, Lela Rose (Art’92) finds herself succeeding in a fashion industry that is often fickle and fiercely competitive.

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Creating star power

One of Phil Lobel’s (A&S ex’79) favorite stories, stretching back to his early days as a Hollywood publicist, took place in a sushi restaurant on Sunset Boulevard in 1987.

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Flying in the face of cancer

Cancer is the country’s No. 2 killer, following heart disease. Professor Tin Tin Su is working to develop powerful new tools in the fight against the deadly disease.

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Reaping the wind

Wind power? Big deal.Really, really big deal, in fact.
Consider that scientists are now pondering construction of leviathan, 20-megawatt wind turbines some 190 meters high — basically two football fields — with swooping 125-meter rotor blades.

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When Everest speaks

As he plodded across Mount Everest’s knife-edge Summit Ridge on May 20, 2011, Neal Beidleman (MechEngr’81) realized something was not right.

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Shoulder to shoulder

Cheering on players amid sun, rain, snow and bitter cold, 87-year-old twins Betty Fitzgerald Hoover (A&S’46) and Peggy Fitzgerald Coppom (A&S’46) may hold the record for attending the most CU sports games ever.

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WWII – Women at war

When Tom Brokaw wrote his paean to the Greatest Generation, he left them out. Filmmaker Ken Burns skipped them when he documented The War. They are the estimated 100,000 women who joined the military during World War II.

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Parent Power

One of the last parts of the brain to mature is the prefrontal cortex. What this means is that — please don’t take this the wrong way — the odds are that your 18-year-old isn’t playing with a full deck.

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Exercising to remember

For those looking for another reason to get out and exercise, a CU-Boulder study reveals that just a little physical exercise can help protect us from long-term memory loss in old age.

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A man’s man

Sportsman Tred Barta (A&S ex’74), pictured above, has overcome a paralyzing stroke to make his hunting and fishing show more popular than ever.

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Concrete results

How did Dave Zanetell (MCivEngr’93) guide the construction of the Western hemisphere’s longest concrete arch bridge?

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Dear God!

Buy your ticket now for the most offensive, irreverent and popular Broadway show in town. The Book of Mormon, which opened in March, is a stunning box office hit created by Matt Stone (Art, Math’93) and Trey Parker (A&S ex’93).

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Feeling insecure?

Your best-kept secrets are at the fingertips of nearly anyone who wants to find them, says law professor Paul Ohm, a national expert on internet law.

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Finding peace on the devil’s highway

In 1993 Urrea’s nonfiction debut, Across the Wire (Anchor), was a New York Times notable book of the year. His autobiographical Nobody’s Son: Notes from an American Life (University of Arizona Press) won an American Book Award in 1999, and his chronicle of an illegal border crossing turned deadly, The Devil’s Highway (Back Bay Books), was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2005. Urrea also received rave reviews for The Hummingbird’s Daughter (Back Bay Books), a novel about the life of his charismatic great aunt.

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Playing house for a living

Meridith Baer (Jour’70), a former model, actress and Hollywood screenwriter who fashioned her ultimate plot twist at age 50 by reinventing herself as a niche entrepreneur. In little more than a decade, Baer has become Los Angeles’ star of staging — the gentle art of temporarily furnishing and decorating a home so it sells faster and for more money.

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She’s got a ticket to ride

As a researcher of bioastronautics — the study of supporting life in space — 25-year-old Fanchiang is right where she wants to be. The Dream Chaser is designed to be a shuttle service to the International Space Station and to launch tourists into Earth’s orbit.

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Battling muscle loss

CU-Boulder molecular, cellular and developmental biology professor Bradley Olwin’s research on stem cell transplants and muscle repair may offer new hope for boosting quality of life.

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