Coloradan Magazine

University of Colorado Boulder

Peace in Sight

A medical mission to South Sudan, home to the world’s highest rates of blindness, opens Jordan Campbell’s (Comm’91) eyes to a new direction.

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The Red Zinger

Growing up under the shadow of Celestial Seasonings, Sarah Siegel-Magness (Bus’95) discovers her own cup of tea is in film production and fashion.

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Our Man

After spending a lifetime in film as an actor, director and producer, Robert Redford braved the sea and starred as the sole character in the film AlIs Lost.

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The Invisible War

What Happens When the U.S. Military — The Most Powerful Institution in the World — Fails to Protect Those Who Protect Us?

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Success from Skratch

Sports physiologist Allen Lim’s secret mixes from natural ingredients are giving energy bar and drink companies a run for their money.

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Fractured Communities

In an unprecedented study, CU professors and students are exploring ways to maximize the benefits of oil and domestic natural gas extraction while decreasing potential negative impacts on the environment and communities.

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Power to the People

Some of the world’s most successful political movements have brought about change without violence, says Erica Chenoweth (MPolSci’04, PhD’07).

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Rarefied Air

Fifty years ago, Tom Hornbein (A&S’52) made history by being part of the team that put the first american on top of Everest.

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South Park’s Unsung Genius

When animation director and co-producer of South Park Eric Stough (Film’95) started work on the quirky adult sitcom show 16 years ago, he cut out the famous cartoon characters from construction paper.

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Making a Splash

On a night hike in Australia where the tide comes in more than 14 miles, Jennifer Lewin (EnvDes’97) noticed the water left a creation of flat tidal pools. Fascinated by how the light from the moon shone into the many circles of water, she jumped from puddle to puddle.

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The Man Who Charted the Red Zone

He does not own the patent or copyright, nor does he take credit for naming a statistic that has become a staple in football for the better part of 30 years. But scoring efficiency from the “red zone’’ — the portion of the field between the 20-yard lines and the goal line — is the brainchild of CU sports information director Dave Plati (Jour’82).

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A New Recruit

With black and gold dogs, wife Liz Bacon Chreist (ComDisor’98) — whom he met on a Vail chairlift while skiing in 2001 — and years of experience with alumni, parents and students around the world, it’s hard to imagine a better fit.

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From Ashes

I remember, almost too vividly, the day my mother and I vacuumed up my 12-year-old brother from the tired shag carpet.

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Finding Genes That Fit

Ask Joaquin Espinosa what he sees as the key to curing cancer, and he answers with a blend of ancient Chinese philosophy and cutting-edge genetics.

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Ready, Set, Go

Lean and tan, with a youthful determination in his stride, Dan King (ChemEngr’82, MBA’88) splashed through rivers and leapt over hurdles, blazing past much younger competitors on the last six miles of the nationally televised CEO Endurance World Championship in Tennessee last fall. Sprinting across the finish, as he clinched the title of “World’s Fittest CEO,” he didn’t look all that different than he did during his glory days on the CU cross-country team.

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Breaking Ground

John Branch (Mktg’89, MJour’96) wins the Pulitzer Prize for his captivating and tragic story about an avalanche that swept over a group of expert skiers in Washington’s backcountry.

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Chilling Out

Bike riding and thirst are inseparable partners, a fact that has put Judy Amabile (Comm’80, MBA’85) where she is today — sitting atop a successful company and enjoying the spoils of the free enterprise system.

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Weighty Dreams

Yes, researchers have known for a while about a link between sleep and weight. People who sleep less than six hours are at greater risk for obesity, which can lead to diabetes, heart disease and even cancer.

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