Coloradan Magazine Archives

University of Colorado Boulder

Dr. Gridiron

In the annals of CU football, Derek McCartney has a famous name. Now he’s making one for himself.

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CU Wins Fourth Nobel Prize

David Wineland, CU’s fifth Nobel Laureate won the award for “groundbreaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems.”

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From Battles to Books

As U.S. involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan winds down, veterans are filling classrooms across the nation, including at CU-Boulder. Adjusting to civilian life isn’t always easy.

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My Dog Always Eats First

For many homeless people, owning a pet doesn’t just mean companionship. It can spur transformative behavioral changes that can save their lives.

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Divestiture

Oren has lived here his whole life, and the river path is where he used to hunt for pop bottles. I grew up somewhere else, but I remember the hunt, the triumph of a good haul.

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Ground Control

Who controls the satellites we see at night? Nearly 25 CU undergrads monitor four of them, collecting critical information about the Earth, sun and our galaxy.

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Rocket Man

“That seems like a long time ago,” says the 87-year-old Carpenter who was the first of 18 CU-Boulder astronauts to fly in space. “I still remember what a thrill it was being up there. I liked the feeling of weightlessness and the view I had of the Earth.”

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Gut reaction

What if your health isn’t solely dependent on what you eat and your genes? Associate professor Rob Knight’s research reveals that bacteria in your body could play a more vital role than previously thought.

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Born to be wild

You know the type. He drives too fast, eschews helmets and seatbelts, delights in things the rest of us find terrifying and views the threat of harm or punishment as a dare, not a danger.

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Revolutionary nurse

How did one woman help bring health care to hundreds of thousands of Americans by pioneering the nurse practitioner movement?

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On the road

The sun is beating down, and we’re sitting on the cement back steps of my dad’s rock house, a sprawling structure one mile off Highway 50 and 60 miles west of Austin in central Nevada. Zach reads to me from Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency by Douglas Adams. Adams, best known for The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, dedicated this book to his mother who liked the science-fiction mystery for “the bit about the horse.”

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Blind Encounters

Had Jeff Evans(Anth’94) and a friend not found themselves in a hairy situation atop Lizard Head, arguably the single most difficult peak to climb in Colorado, he might not be known as one of the world’s top climbing guides today.

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Class Act

“Sometimes playing in the dirt is learning about the dirt, too,” Rahmani says. “It’s about getting students to make connections between their lives and the world around them in a scientific manner.”

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Flash Cadillac, Sugarloaf and the Astronauts

This summer, The Astronauts will be one of three famous CU-based 1960s-era bands inducted into the Colorado Music Hall of Fame, alongside the down-and-dirty greasers of Flash Cadillac and the Continental Kids, aka Flash Cadillac, and the hippy popsters of Sugarloaf.

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Courtside advantage

In her first column for ESPN-W, the up-and-coming women’s website for the sports-media giant, Kate Fagan (Comm’03) chose to remember her most significant moment as a Colorado basketball player.

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Leafing through summer

Celebrate summer by taking some time for yourself and reading a book. To assist in compiling your summer reading list, a handful of professors and alumni who have been featured in the Coloradan during the past year have shared their favorite books.

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Extreme scavenger hunt

Eight years ago, Gregg Treinish (Soc’02) was struggling up a rocky path in Pennsylvania along the Appalachian Trail when he had an epiphany that would shape his future.

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AIDS interrupted

When molecular virologist Julie Overbaugh (PhDChem’83) first touched down in Kenya in 1993, the HIV epidemic was in full swing, with 9 million people in sub-Saharan Africa infected —14 million worldwide — and new infections among women and newborns ravaging the continent.

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Dashboard deals

“I love being able to have an idea and make it happen,” says Newman, who owns a design and development firm with Gayer and has several other business ventures under his belt. “I really just like creating cool new things.”

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The Natural

Barney Feinblum (MBA’75) helped transform the natural food industry from a hippy niche to an $81 billion enterprise. His most recent project? Reopening the legendary Alfalfa’s on Broadway and Arapahoe.

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Climate Crusade

Ask professional big mountain skier Chris Davenport (Hist’93) what he’s been doing for work lately, and he’ll rattle off a list of epic adventures that leaves even the most ambitious powder-hounds salivating. In 2011 alone, he skied 150 days on six continents, guided a client up Mount Everest, completed a rare ski descent of its fabled Lhotse Face (elevation 24,000 feet) and led adventure travelers on an eight-day excursion to the untouched powder stashes of the Antarctic Peninsula.

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A passion for fashion

From designing dresses for actresses Susan Sarandon and Michelle Pfeiffer to outfitting Jenna and Barbara Bush, Lela Rose (Art’92) finds herself succeeding in a fashion industry that is often fickle and fiercely competitive.

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Creating star power

One of Phil Lobel’s (A&S ex’79) favorite stories, stretching back to his early days as a Hollywood publicist, took place in a sushi restaurant on Sunset Boulevard in 1987.

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Flying in the face of cancer

Cancer is the country’s No. 2 killer, following heart disease. Professor Tin Tin Su is working to develop powerful new tools in the fight against the deadly disease.

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